Friday, October 31, 2014

NEW! Senior Expo & Forum:



Cochenour Gallery, Georgetown College, Georgetown, KY
November 7 – November 21, 2014
Reception and lecture: Friday, November 7, 12:00-2:00 p.m.

Georgetown College is pleased to present Teach Talent. A team of researchers, Catherine Shelburne and Miranda Sosby, will explore the current issues in art education. Why is talent important? How can it be recognized? How can it be nurtured? Recent reports claim that there is a desperate need for talent outside the realm of what higher education provides. Creativity, emotional intelligence, and true enjoyment, lacking or not, are skills that can be taught. By simply implementing a few proposed ideas into the secondary school programs today, the team suggests, we can significantly increase our talent-pool for the future.

The project will launch at the Cochenour Gallery and run through November 21, with an opening reception on Friday, November 7 from 12:00 to 2:00 p.m. The related presentation by Ms. Shelburne will begin at 12:30 p.m., to be followed by a brief Q&A session. The gallery will host Teach Talent’s direct proposals, interactive teaching tools, and their ideas for curricular/content managing. All events are free and open to the public.


Both Catherine Shelburne and Miranda Sosby are 2014 BA candidates at Georgetown College.

For further information please contact:

Jeanette Tesmer, Director of Art Galleries and Curator of Collections
Phone: 502-863-8399


Thursday, September 25, 2014

Fotofocus Biennial; Congrats Sheldyn!

The Cincinnati Fotofocus Biennial is coming up in a few weeks, featuring numerous exhibitions, lectures, and photography opportunities from October 8–November 1, with most of the events occurrung during our Fall Break (Oct. 8–12). I attended in 2012 and had a wonderful experience gallery hopping in downtown Cinci.


Super big congratulations to our very own Sheldyn Duff whose work was juried into the regional student show. Her work and others will be on display at the Findlay Street Project Space with an opening reception on Saturday, October 11 from 11 AM–2 PM.

Image: Sheldyn Duff, Untitled, Archival Digital Print, 2014

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Grand Gesture @ PUBLIC, through Sep. 27

Grand Gesture, Paintings by Boris Zakic, will be on exhibit August 14 –September 27, 2014 at PUBLIC, the LVAA’s gallery in Downtown Louisville.
A subtle examination of mark making expands to embrace sweepingly romantic pictorialism in an ambitious new exhibition from Zakic. In the large canvases reminiscent of the late Baroque or Romantic periods, Zakic combines what might seem like conflicting elements into the magnificent allegories of love with a lush, continental grandeur.
“Initially, the gestures were to have an unparalleled ‘airiness,’ as if extensions to an evening breeze or a kind of bird song you may hear in the mornings,” explains Zakic. Brushstrokes, simultaneously abstract and highly realistic permeate representational images and evoke art movements that are, on their surface, in opposition to the modern sensibility of Zakic’s recent projects. If you have seen his Shhh, Flicker (Galerie Hertz, 2014) or the Painting at The New Albany Bicentennial Public Art Project (2013-2015), the Grand Gesture will rather surprise and perhaps amaze you. (preview available here)
Zakic has taught at Georgetown College since 2000, where he teaches a popular painting course for art majors entitled Impasto Mannerisms. The course is dedicated to the study of gesturalist painting almost exclusively. In 2010 Zakic received the Frank F. Weisberg Award for Excellence in Painting from the Louisville Visual Art Association. In addition, a concurrent exhibit, Grand Gesture: Sublime, will be at Eastern Kentucky University’s Fred Parker Giles Gallery (link) August 18 – September 12, 2014.

Sublime @ EKU: promo card!

I cordially invite you all to my EKU expo and the reception on September 11th, 5-7 pm (directions)


Food For Thought, Boat Club, Louisville, Sep.16th

Boris Zakic, "Grand Gesture" from Louisville Visual Art on Vimeo.

welcome back!

It is very exciting time, particularly for me: I have been missing teaching very much over the last few months. In the next few days, all of us (art faculty) will be spending time with our new orientation groups, eagerly looking ahead to a jam-packed year of events and projects -- please join us anytime!

above: waiting for shuttle to Windsor Gardens (service project)
above: lining up for the class photo yesterday evening, class of 2018

To all tigers (incoming or returning): Have a great 1st day of class!!!

FALL 2014!!!!!

It's a move-in day: I have just finished painting Earl Gray's office, only to opt for my old "white" one. Have a look below -- feels like a gallery now!

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Embracing Challenges

"Momentum," a light and sound show at The Curve, an art space at the Barbican Center in London.
Galleries are creating unconventional  spaces to showcase unusual exhibits.
Credit James Medcraft/Barbican 
What is an "unconventional" space? In the gallery world, unconventional usually means non-rectangular. Take a look at the space at Barbican, London. This area shown above was deemed a concourse (think airport) non-site yet it has become the hub of installations of late. Artists are drawn to the unusual space and take advantage of it. A former challenge is now embraced.

Here's a photo of the lavish interior of the Guggenheim.
I took this photograph last Winter at the Gutai exhibition.


Exterior of the Guggenheim, New York


An unconventional space that might be a bit more familiar comes from our art history survey textbooks...Frank Lloyd Wright's structure for the space that would become known as the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum on New York's Upper East Side. Think of the Guggenheim as one piece of bread and the Met as the other—the slices of architecture embrace the natural environment of Central Park.

When it opened in 1959, the Guggenheim was deemed an eyesore because it was considered a work of (applied) art that could perhaps detract from the real art on view. Like the Barbican's space, the Guggenheim presented installation challenges — how to hang in a space that lacks 90-degree angles. But now, this New York gem is a coveted space for artists to use. Truly, artists of the modern and contemporary eras have risen to the challenge and embraced such overbearing structures and, as a result, have activated spaces in new ways.

Perhaps in a very short while, London's Barbican will become the kind of cultural icon that Solomon R.'s building has become.